The Two Types of Peripheral Artery Disease Explained | Medical NotePAD



Published
The Two Types of Peripheral Artery Disease Explained | Medical NotePAD
with Dr. Anahita Dua, Mass General, Boston, Massachusettes.

Introduction: Medical NotePAD, brought to you by Patient Advocacy Organization’s Take A Stand Against Amputation and The Way To My Heart. Here is Dr. Kirk Minkus, Vascular & Interventional Radiologist at Southwest Cardiovascular Associates in Phoenix, Arizona, “What is Peripheral Artery Disease, Its Symptoms and Risk Factors.”

Dr. Kirk Minkus: Hi, my name is Dr. Kirk Minkus, and I'm an interventional radiologist and vascular specialist that works in Phoenix, Arizona. I want to talk to you today about something called peripheral arterial disease, which is an affliction that affects the legs and can seriously restrict the amount of arterial blood flow that moves from your heart down to your toes and mainly in the arterial vessels of your pelvis, your legs and your feet.

People that have this development may have claudication, which is pain while you walk; limitation to how far you can walk; pain and cramping in the calves or the legs; discoloration of the feet and toes, maybe a purple or blue color; numbness in your feet or toes; tingling that you feel in your legs or your feet; and lack of hair on your legs that may be noticeable.

As well, the risk factors that are associated with peripheral arterial disease are people that are 50 years or older, people that have diabetes, hypertension or high blood pressure, hyperlipidemia or high cholesterol, or anyone that's had a stroke or heart attack, or anyone that possibly has had renal insufficiency or kidney failure. Also, anyone that currently smokes or previously did smoke can be at risk for peripheral arterial disease. If you have any of these symptoms or risk factors [go to thewaytomyheart.org]. You really should get in touch with a vascular specialist like myself so we can discuss with you all the treatments we have to help resolve these symptoms for you.

Conclusion: With Medical NotePAD, that was Dr. Kirk Minkus, Vascular & Interventional Radiologist at Southwest Cardiovascular Associates in Phoenix, Arizona. The Medical NotePAD series is for educational and informational purposes only. Advice offered is not a substitute for medical advice from your own supervising physician. Do not act on any information provided in this series without the explicit consent from your own healthcare team. For more information, go to standagainstamputation.com and for support go to thewaytomyheart.org.
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